Van Marwijk was last week reported to be paying for his newly-arrived support staff out of his own pocket as part of his short-term deal with the FFA.

Sources within the FFA this week also confirmed they won't be paying the salaries of the entourage, which includes former Dutch star Mark van Bommel, son-in-law of van Marwijk.

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"Our deal was with Bert," said one FFA source. "If he wants to bring in anyone else, that's fine but our deal is with him and he'll have to make his own arrangements."

As well as van Bommel, van Marwijk has also brought in his long term sidekick Roel CoumansΒ from his days in Belgian football, as well some of his backroom team from Saudi Arabia.

But the FFA still have all Ange's assistants and coaches on staff, including Ante Milicic and even Mile Sterjovski, who was acting as a player liaison/welfare link between the squad and Postecoglou.

It's believed the FFA backroom staff in Russia now runs to 33 people as a result, not including executives like David Gallop.

But veteran Dutch reporter Johannes Kapteijns from De Telegraaf has been told van Marwijk is specifically not paying the salaries of his Dutch coaching team.

"He denies that he pays for those guys himself," Kapteijns tells the new 442FM podcast. "He says it's not true. I think they're being paid, but I don't know how.

"Maybe the FFA said they have some budget and you can have this part, but if you want these assistants maybe your part is a little smaller.

"I think the main reason, especially on such a short term project, is that he wants to work on it with people he knows very well.

"He said that with just a blink of the eye, these guys know exactly what I want and we don't have so much time to lose.

"But you have got a very big staff now."

Postecoglou's recruited staff are also taking part in the training sessions ahead of the arrival of future coach Graham Arnold post-Russia who will effectively decide their futures.

"There's a lot of peeople on the training pitch," admitted Kapteijns. "I think it can be complicated how those people react and can they still do the work?

"You have got a lot of people on the pitch... but he thinks he needs them for this project."